HomeHow are countries supporting community HL schools?

Forum for discussions on how and what kind of supports other countries provide to heritage language schools

How other countries are helping HL schools 

Masako
Masako
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Posts: 16


10/28/2022
Masako
Masako
Administrator
Posts: 16
※This posting is a summary of the discussion that took place in the networking session at the Coalition Conference in 2022

Some countries (former colonial superpowers) run a network of languages and culture institutes, such as Konfucius (China), Goethe (Germany), Cervantes (Spain), British Council (Great Britain), Alliance Francaise (France).
Some central and east European countries (Lithuania, Latvia, Slovakia, Czechia, Hungary, Albania) support their diaspora communities abroad, with the purpose of supporting their languages, cultures, bridges created by people, and diplomatic, business, political, and other connections. This support entails for example grants, teacher training, material, scholarships for young people to study at universities in the country of origin, sometimes salaries for teachers, sometimes they send trained teachers to large communities abroad. It may be relevant, that in these countries, there is one national language that somehow equals the national identity. Ambassadors and even presidents visit HL language schools abroad to show them support.
Multilingual countries such as India do not support their individual languages in HL programs abroad. The Tamil HL language communities, for example, can reach out to states within India to get support. However, there is no financial support available. As an example, in the US there is a collaboration of Tamil schools that organize a Tamil congress every four years. Such congress is coming up in May 2023. Another example of Tamil-speaking communities is in the countries of Singapore and Malaysia. There are large minorities living there, also 2nd and 3rd generation. They often speak and understand Tamil well. Also, Tamil is taught in compulsory schools as a part of compulsory education. In these countries, the “manpower” or the high number of Tamil speakers means that they are visible and their language is taught in schools.
Another kind of support is the support of local communities of all HL languages and multilingualism. Examples of this are Canada and Iceland. In Canada, multilingualism is a part of national policy. In Iceland, Reykjavík has supported Móðurmál – the Association on Bilingualism and thus, all existing HL programs, small and big.
Yet another example of local support of HL programs is when the country makes mother tongue / heritage language education a part of its educational system. Examples of this are Norway, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Swiss, Ontario in Canada, and Victoria in Australia. This solution is complicated and does not always render the same results as learning HL in CBHLS but it means official recognition of the language rights and language competencies of plurilingual children.
A lucky combination is when the country of origin supports its HL programs abroad, there is a coalition of same-language HL schools, and the local authorities support all HL programs. Additionally, support from international networks strengthens the work of HL schools and coalitions.
(Note taken by Renata Emilsson Peskova and Sashi Vaidyanathan)
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Masako
Masako
Administrator
Posts: 16


10/28/2022
Masako
Masako
Administrator
Posts: 16
※This posting is a summary of the discussion that took place in the networking session at the Coalition Conference in 2022


Hungary's supports
There are several ways Hungary supports the diaspora not only in Europe, but all around the globe.
In recent years (since 2010s) the Hungarian Government has launched several programs and initiatives in order to strengthen the relationship with the Hungarian diaspora community and to help them preserve their Hungarian identity and cultural heritage far from the mother country.
Let me share a few successful initiatives with you.

Hungarian Diaspora Scholarship was established by the Hungarian government for those who live in a Hungarian diaspora outside of Europe and wish to study at a Hungarian higher education institution. 28 universities and colleges are offering more than 1400 full degree (masters, Phd) and non-degree programs free of charge for the scholarship holders for the duration of their studies.

Korosi Csoma Sandor Program: Over 70 (before covid and recession: 140) young Hungarian scholarship holders are sent to 24+ counties all around the world to teach Hungarian, folk dance, organize programs, help the given community, etc. All expenses are payed by the Hungarian government.

Community Based Hungarian Weekend School leaders are invited to Budapest, Hungary once a year from all over the world to attend the large conference. All expenses payed by Hungarian government. Presentations, etc.

Once or twice a year a week-long teacher training is offered in Budapest to community based Hungarian language schools.

University of Gyor (Szechenyi Istvan University) offers further training for teachers who work in community based heritage schools in US, Europe...

A series of language books are developed for children by Hungarian language specialists. Embassies and consulates help distribute them.

Schools, churches, cultural associations, etc can apply for grant from Hungarian Government to support their organizations (for teacher salaries, books, rent, travel expenses, etc).
(Note taken by ildiko Pataki)
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JoyPeyton
JoyPeyton
Posts: 3


10/30/2022
JoyPeyton
JoyPeyton
Posts: 3
This discussion is going to be incredibly helpful to all of us. As we learn how different countries are supporting Community-Based Schools, we can advocate for that support in our countries. Maybe at some point we can outline an advocacy action plan.
I would love to also include a discussion of how the U.S. is supporting our schools.
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Masako
Masako
Administrator
Posts: 16


11/3/2022
Masako
Masako
Administrator
Posts: 16
Japanese government support for JHL schools/programs in the U.S.
The Japan Foundation, a special legal entity supervised by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and an incorporated administrative agency, has been supporting JHL schools and programs in the U.S.
The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles provides support in the following three areas: 1) Grant assistance, 2) Data collection and research, and 3) a JHL online platform, currently in development. The Japan Foundation offers two types of grants which are applicable to individual schools. The Salary Assistance Grant for Japanese courses , supports non-profit educational institutions, including JHL schools or school districts in the U.S. that are facing temporary financial difficulties. The Salary Assistance Grant covers a part of the Japanese language instructor’s salary and fringe benefits (up to $30,000 per year, provided on a cost-sharing basis). In the past five years, at least one or two JHL schools have received grants, ranging from $10.000 to $20.000. In the year of 2020, the Japan Foundation provided a one-time COVID-19 Salary Assistance Relief Grant to four JHL schools which allowed them to maintain courses endangered by budgetary cuts.
The other grant which applies to individual programs is the Teaching Material Purchase Grant. The Japan Foundation provides a school or program with up to $1,000 to purchase various materials used in class. At least one school is awarded this grant every year, and five JHL schools got this grant in 2021.
The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles conducted a survey in early 2020 of JHL schools in the U.S. and gathered more information regarding the current situation of JHL schools in the U.S. and their needs. The newest type of support JFLA is planning to offer in early 2023 is an online platform for JHL teachers and parents in the U.S. to enable them to access information related to JHL education and to facilitate communication among them.
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